Backing track for practicing lead to in A

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DeepDrummer
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Backing track for practicing lead to in A

Post by DeepDrummer » Sat Nov 26, 2011 4:01 pm

HI. After today's profound supplied by Weelie (thanks for that), I tried to figure out how I could work up to keeping the time while trying to accompany the music and even to solo along with at times.
I decided the quickest way for me to get started by making a backing track and since I'm itching to play along to it, I revamped an old piece and took out some of the other instruments, rearranged to simplify the rythm part with a singl whole note chord per bar in the most basic of 12 bar patterns without even a turn around chord. I used an AM...Dm.Em, Dm, Am..
Still not sure if a DM is appropriate. Actually I'm not sure about much but I have a feeling it just may be cool to noodle around with. Any suggestions for improvements or correction are always welcome. I'm pretty green at guitar. I do want to keep it simple though. It's just a backing track to practice with played back from written notes using music composition software.
It's at 100 BPM. I can speed it up or slow it down pretty easy if need be too. Thanks again Weelie.
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Practice backing track in A at 100 bpm
backing track for guitar in A using Minor Chords.mp3 - (5.13 MiB)

Music is in my Soul and the Blues Makes me whole.

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2WheelsOfBlues
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Re: Backing track for practicing lead to in A

Post by 2WheelsOfBlues » Sat Nov 26, 2011 5:19 pm

thanks for sharing :thumbsup:
play guitar like the wind, mysterious but definitely present....

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VikingBlues
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Re: Backing track for practicing lead to in A

Post by VikingBlues » Sat Nov 26, 2011 6:52 pm

DeepDrummer wrote:I revamped an old piece and took out some of the other instruments, rearranged to simplify the rythm part with a singl whole note chord per bar in the most basic of 12 bar patterns without even a turn around chord. I used an AM...Dm.Em, Dm, Am..
Still not sure if a DM is appropriate. Actually I'm not sure about much but I have a feeling it just may be cool to noodle around with. Any suggestions for improvements or correction are always welcome. I'm pretty green at guitar. I do want to keep it simple though. It's just a backing track to practice with played back from written notes using music composition software.
It's at 100 BPM. I can speed it up or slow it down pretty easy if need be too.
:thumbsup: That should work out just fine for you as something to noodle along to using A minor pentatonic, plus blue note. If you feel inclined the F and B of the Aeolian mode should fit in well there too (but that's maybe going too complicated).

I'm impressed with how that sounds as a music composition software playback - I guess either you've got good at it, or it's better software than guitar pro 6, or (quite likely) I don't know what I'm doing with gp6. Or amybe all three!
An improv a day keeps the demons at bay!

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DeepDrummer
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Re: Backing track for practicing lead to in A

Post by DeepDrummer » Sun Nov 27, 2011 12:36 pm

Thanks guys. Yes I was using the A Pentatonic Minor myself or at least the 3/5ths of it that I know so far. I was avoiding the F and B. oooo yeah, I see that B fits in nicely in some nice spots as does the F. Not too complicated at all. That's the kind of feedback I need. I use Sibelius 7 for composing. I did a trial for GP5 a while ago and it didn't really appeal to me but I realize it is the preferred choice of many and the GPx files are all over the net. Sibelius 7 really gets it's teeth into it with a viewable fretbaord for guitar parts that you can just click on a fret and it inputs the note. So you end up with measures full of the notes you indicated via the fretbaord that you want. I'll be just noodling around and suddenly I'll just have to jump on the computer and notate it. Then when the piece is done or at least the guitar part is done. I add another guitar picking tab instead of notation and simply copy and paste the other part to it and voila, the piece in tabs. Actually one could just use a tab guitar and input via fretboard as well. By using the notation however you can past the guitar part to another instrument and work from that section eliminating or adding what you want but it gives a nice frame of reference. On playback it also highlights each fret as it is played. Very cool. One can get better sounds out of it by purchasing certain sampling programs but stock is good enough for my uses. You can put chords of 3 notes and up by simply typing in a chord name and then you can cycle through a lot of different variations of the chord. Or you can enter the notes you want to play within the chord and then pick Name from notes and it names it for you. Between that and Tux guitar, there's a lot of potential for me. And of course you can input notes by midi or I believe even via microphone but I haven't tried that yet. I have been hounding SIbelius for 4 years trying to get better guitar stuff and they have come through pretty good with this version. Upgrades are not too steep in price but the price of admission the first time is steep. Much steeper when I first bought it though. They have chopped the price to 1/3 of what it used to be. I have a good deal of music theory under my belt but being mostly self taught since high school, there are these huge gaps. My wifes grandaughter was over the other day and I was playing around with the A Pentatonic Minor at that time and she asked "How long did it take you to learn how to play guitar?" I replied. "I don't know how to play the guitar." She looked at me like I had two heads but I meant it. Gotta fill those gaps and you guys are helping. hmmm that F and B look pretty tempting. They'll be introduced to my fingers today. Whenever I watch B. B. King and try to figure out what scales and stuff he is using I always go what the...? Sibelius is supposed to be able to notate hammer ons pull offs and bends and slides and everything but it's hard to learn to do on the page. Much easier just on the guitar. The manual is about 700 pages. It takes a long time to learn but the new version is easier. I'm not affiliated with Sibelius in any way except that I tend to ride them about guitar stuff through their forum. Lots of classical high and mighty orchestra types and teachers use it. Finale and Sibelius both have 30 day demos but with the demos you don't get the megagigabytes of sounds. Just some trashy midi sounds in the demo so if you try it, don't judge by the sounds you get. Warning. It takes a while to learn. I've been 5 years at it and haven't probably learned a tenth of all the cool things you can do. SIbelius is my bandmates and the other members of my band are all stuck inside that box but I am trying to get her grandchildren into it too. They went home with a guitar and amp the other day (can't tell what's in the box for Chistmas). I've got all the instruments and through Reaper I can record tracks but my efforts so far at playing all the parts always gets stalled on the lead guitar. I Do take ideas from here and there but I rarely bother to learn someone elses whole song. Darnitall, I can think the Blues but it's a slow climb to be able to play it. Coming along slowly and enjoying the ride. You guys and this site are the best. I mean the absolute best. The tabs on the web page of all those greats are an incredible resource. I won't steal the song but I may just borrow a lick or two. I mean a double pulloff I found a few days ago (or so I call it) Pull off with one finger and then with the other. Amazing. Who'd have thunk it. Thanks to this site. Looking forward to checking out that F and B big time. Thank you sir!!
Music is in my Soul and the Blues Makes me whole.

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VikingBlues
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Re: Backing track for practicing lead to in A

Post by VikingBlues » Sun Nov 27, 2011 8:34 pm

DeepDrummer wrote:Yes I was using the A Pentatonic Minor myself or at least the 3/5ths of it that I know so far. I was avoiding the F and B. oooo yeah, I see that B fits in nicely in some nice spots as does the F. Not too complicated at all. That's the kind of feedback I need.
With those minor chords it cries out natural minor (Aeolian).

I struggled with not knowing how to play modes for years - I was totally baffled by the lengthy complex technical jargon that always seemed to go into any discussion / teaching of it. The I heard a teacher called David Wallimann point out - if you know the pentatonic it's very easy to know the modes as you already know 5 of the 7 notes of that mode. Right enough. Take A Minor pentatonic. Add F and B - that's Aeolian. Add F# and B - that's Dorian. Add F and Bb - that's Phrygian. Then he showed this on the fretboard pattern / shapes. Talk about a moment of clarity. Wherever there's three frets (half tones) between notes on the minor pentatonic - the Dorian adds two notes a half tone below the top one of all of those notes seperated by three frets (half notes) - the Phrygian adds two notes a half tone above the lower one of all of those notes seperated by three frets (hamf notes). OK the Aeolian is slightly more complicated as there is one of the extra notes one fret below and the other extra note is one above. But what the hell - that's much easier to understand than several pages of complex terminology.

I'll admit to also being a little startled when I realised from what he said that it wasn't the lead line playing the notes of a mode / scale that created the sound, it was the combination of the underlying arrangement and chords with that lead line - I'm, afraid I'm a bit dim about these things! :big_smile:
DeepDrummer wrote: I use Sibelius 7 for composing.
Then again if you can use composing software and teh likes of Sibelius to teh extent you do I'm guessing you might just eat up several pages of complex terminology with no problem. Respect! :pray:
An improv a day keeps the demons at bay!

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DeepDrummer
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Re: Backing track for practicing lead to in A

Post by DeepDrummer » Mon Nov 28, 2011 2:08 pm

I eat up everything musical. Committing it to memory is a tougher nut to crack. All I read anymore is about things musical. What can be learned is endless and no doubt I won't even put a dent in it. But yes. I eat it up. Putting things in perspective like what you just wrote here VikingBlues is what drives things like that home.
I talked to a brain guy who was an expert on the brain and stuff. I asked him while taking a 13 week training course for the second time after 4 years away from that particular job "I took all this before and did really well and now I am taking the same thing again and I am finding it very tough." He said "that's the problem. It doesn't excite you this time around so you tend to zone out and cannot learn." What I am trying to say is no matter how many times I read about modes, I haven't really been able to relate to how to use it." Your post instantly makes that exciting for me. Thank you so much!!!
Music is in my Soul and the Blues Makes me whole.

atza

Re: Backing track for practicing lead to in A

Post by atza » Mon May 07, 2012 9:12 am

For backing tracks I use a software called Chord Pad-a chord sequencer.I like to have control over my backing tracks and it just let you so-adjust tempo,key,instruments and even style (250+ great sounding styles)

http://www.desktopmetronome.com/c5/inde ... sequencer/

here is a quick blues-funk track (done in 2 minutes...)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUPLo6w_nnY

here is a demo video of the software:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tBRlJDuavk0

Toriginal
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Re: Backing track for practicing lead to in A

Post by Toriginal » Tue Nov 20, 2012 2:28 pm

Very cool!!

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